Drones to prevent the dumps

Drones are absolutely taking off. And not just for military or consumer purposes, also to aid in conservation  and environmental management. This week there was yet another excellent example of drones being used to track down environmentally-damaging behaviour: the Australian (Victorian) Environment Protection Agency (EPA) has been using drones to track down illegal rubbish dumps.

What do you think? A good idea or too much technology in the sky?

drone

Just droning about.

Day 344: Saving the Planet, One Ocean at a Time

After yesterday’s dire warning and message, I thought today it might be nice to look at a happy story again; that of the Katerva Awards, which go to people working on global sustainability, working on big changes. To find these stars, Katerva uses hundreds of professionals and filtering stages, until a handful of deserved winners are announced each year.

In 2015 it was Dutch Boyan Slatt and the Ocean Clean-Up (which I have written about previously on multiple ocassions) who won the top prize. The Ocean Clean-Up proposes to tackle the Great Pacific Garbage Patch by placing massive barriers around it and just letting the rubbish float in! (Alright it’s a lot more complicated than that, check out a more detailed explanation here) Whilst his project has been critized by some for not considering the risks and environmental impacts of such an infrastructural development, I continue to be awed by the ambition and inspiration of the project.

Another prize winner of the same year included yet another Dutch innovation: SaltFarm Texel, which works to develop salt-resistant crops. Traditionally when high salinity strikes we try to reduce it again as to be able to continue cultivating crops; but what if we could cultivate crops which can handle the high salinity in the first place?

For more on the amazing 2015 prize winners, check out Minda Zetlin’s descriptions of them or, for more on Katerva, take a look at their Wikipedia page or website!

 

 

 


There’s 365 days in a year (well, kind of), there’s definitely at least 365 ways to be green (definitely). There’s easy ways, and there’s tougher ways. For some, certain approaches to being green may be easier than others. But here we go, let’s try going from being green to being greener still!

Day 335: Plastic Tides

Plastic Tides combine adventure and conservation: this group of young nature-enthusiasts go out on paddle boards, do some scientific monitoring of the plastic in the ocean, as well as go to schools and places and raise awareness of the problem of oceanic plastic pollution! What an inspiring, thrilling job.

 

 


There’s 365 days in a year (well, kind of), there’s definitely at least 365 ways to be green (definitely). There’s easy ways, and there’s tougher ways. For some, certain approaches to being green may be easier than others. But here we go, let’s try going from being green to being greener still!

Day 332: BirdLife International

Today’s green tip: watch this short, slightly deceiving video! BirdLife International is one of the biggest conservation organisations out there, and although their focus may lie on birds, their work helps protect many more species along the way.

 

 


There’s 365 days in a year (well, kind of), there’s definitely at least 365 ways to be green (definitely). There’s easy ways, and there’s tougher ways. For some, certain approaches to being green may be easier than others. But here we go, let’s try going from being green to being greener still!

Day 316: Rewarding Conservationists

I’ve nattered on about conservation groups a lot lately, and yesterday I touched on renowned biologist/conservationist E.O. Wilson. But are there others out there giving these people and groups a pat on the back, and perhaps the financial assistance to help them keep doing what they’re doing? Or is it all words and work, no reward?

Fortunately, there are some awards out there to show conservationists their work is being appreciate!

 

futurefornature

The Future for Nature Foundation awards those younger than 35 years old for achieving substantial and long-term conservation benefits for a particular plant or animal species, with an element of innovation and leadership in their work.

 wfn

Are you working in grassroots conservation efforts? Do you consider yourself a conservation leader? Then the Whitley Awards from the Whitley Fund for Nature may be the ticket for you. This organisation aims to fund the work of conservationists, give the selected projects a boost in their profile, and raise awareness on the threats to biodiversity in general.

goldman

The Goldman Environmental Award is also awarded to grassroots-level conservationists, across a broad range of conservation targets: from those protecting endangered ecosystems and species to combating destructive development projects, from promoting sustainability to influencing environmental policies and striving for environmental justice. In return for their efforts, the award provides financial support and promotes recognition of these conservationists’ projects.

 

tusk

Another organisation awarding conservationists is TUSK, and the most recent award ceremony was hosted by the Duke of Cambridge. The focus of these awards is African wildlife and a sustainable future, though again the projects awarded can range from awareness-raising and education to the protection of threatened habitat or species.

 


There’s 365 days in a year (well, kind of), there’s definitely at least 365 ways to be green (definitely). There’s easy ways, and there’s tougher ways. For some, certain approaches to being green may be easier than others. But here we go, let’s try going from being green to being greener still!

Day 314: Conservation Travel?

Fancy yourself as a bit of a conservationist? All for Nature provides an opportunity for you to dabble in conservation and travel all at once. At a price, of course!

allfornature

Want to protect those Painted Dogs I wrote about? Pay a neat € 4575 and you may!

wilddogs

Or is it the bears that caught your eye? Well they’re a bargain: go on bear-safari for a mere € 1290!

bigbear

Conservation was never so easy, or fun.

What do you think of organisations such as All for Nature, who combine travel with conservation? Are they helping the conservation movement, or is it mainly a place where people with some money can pay to travel and feel good about themselves at the same time?

For further information on All for Nature be sure to check out their website!


There’s 365 days in a year (well, kind of), there’s definitely at least 365 ways to be green (definitely). There’s easy ways, and there’s tougher ways. For some, certain approaches to being green may be easier than others. But here we go, let’s try going from being green to being greener still!

Day 313: SPOTS

Here’s another for you: SPOTS!

bigcat

SPOTS! (image from Oliver Jenni, Flickr)

This group, Strategic Protection of Threatened Species, focuses predominantly on protecting threatened species (not that surprising, in consideration of its name). They do not, however, focus solely on animals with spots (and also don’t specifically target just one species), working with governments and other organisations to aid in the conservation of species including rhinos, elephants, big cats and even abalone.

How? Well, for once thing, they’re quite proud of their use of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV’s) – aka drones.

What do you think? Are UAV’s the future vehicles of conservation?

For more information, check out:

 


There’s 365 days in a year (well, kind of), there’s definitely at least 365 ways to be green (definitely). There’s easy ways, and there’s tougher ways. For some, certain approaches to being green may be easier than others. But here we go, let’s try going from being green to being greener still!